March 2019 Vaquita Update

More violence mars vaquita protection efforts

This update summarizes net removals from March and news about continuing violence leading to another suspension of net removal efforts. On 13 March a dead vaquita was found in a net by the Sea Shepherd net removal team (more details here). The headless carcass of the female was identified as a vaquita by the Universidad Autónoma de Baja California (University of Baja California-UABC) in Ensenada using genetics and by Museo de la Ballena y Ciencias del Mar (Whale and Marine Science Museum) using skeletal examination. A necropsy was performed by a veterinarian designated by Procuraduría Federal de Protección al Ambiente (Federal Attorney for Environmental Protection)-PROFEPA . With at most 22 vaquitas estimated to remain as of September 2018, the loss of this individual is yet another serious setback.

Following an announcement by the Mexican government that the compensation program to not fish would cease, the cooperatives belonging to the Fishermen Federation decided to return to active gillnet fishing, as a protest and without permits. The spawning season for the corvina (a smaller relative of the totoaba) is March to early May, and and the corvina fishery has been a major source of fishing income in the Upper Gulf. Corvina can be caught using gillnets to actively corral the fish, a practice that is believed to pose less risk to vaquitas than drift gillnetting because the noise from boat engines presumably frightens the vaquitas away from the vicinity of the fishing activity. Crew on the net removal vessels noted that most of the fishermen were staying away from the ‘zero tolerance’ area where the net removal efforts have been concentrated. Also, it is important to mention that fishery organizations indicated that even though their members would be out at sea and fishing, they would avoid the vaquita protection polygons.

On 28 March poachers cut loose a net that the Sea Shepherd vessel Sharpie was in the process of trying to remove. This incident (the Sea Shepherd report of which can be read here) resulted in the accidental shooting by the Navy of one of the poachers (who survived), the burning of the PROFEPA yard containing confiscated fishery items, and the burning of several boats. Later a storage yard outside San Felipe, Rancho el Dorado, that contained many of the nets removed this year was robbed. To date, there has been no punishment for any of these illegal activities.

December
January
February
March
TOTAL
Farley Mowat
41
13
6
35
95
Sharpie
8
26
34
Narval
9
10
6
25
TOTAL
41
22
24
67
154

The number of net removals in March increased as expected with the advancing of the totoaba spawning season. The removal of more nets in March outside the zero tolerance area was partly due to finding few nets inside that area of higher vaquita density (good news!). Removal effort this year is being concentrated on the area where vaquitas were last seen and heard. Like last year, 3 ships have been involved in net-removal efforts in 2019: the Narval (Museo de Ballena) and the Sharpie and Farley Mowat (Sea Shepherd). A summary of efforts during 2018 was given in the December 2018 vaquita update.

The map (Source: Sea Shepherd Conservation Society Internal Reports, 2019) shows the locations of active nets removed through March 2019 by the Farley Mowat, Sharpie and Narval (yellow dots for March and black dots for earlier this totoaba season). The black line shows the area of enhanced protection including both the Vaquita Refuge and the enhanced enforcement area recommended by CIRVA last year (2018). The slanted rectangle indicates the zero tolerance area that was recommended by CIRVA-11 (this year, 2019) for nets to be removed within hours of being deployed because this is an area where vaquitas were known to be concentrated in recent months according to acoustic monitoring and visual observations.

Posted in Critically Endangered, entanglements, Vaquita | Leave a comment

5 Updated Cetacean Red List Assessments Published in March 2019

Assessments or reassessments of 5 cetacean species, subspecies or populations were published on the IUCN Red List in March 2019. This is in addition to the 35 published in November 2018, 10 in July 2018, and 19 in November 2017. A total of 69 cetacean assessments have now been published in the last year and a half.

The updated assessments were of the Striped Dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba), Common Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), Dusky Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obscurus), and Peale’s Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus australis), all of which were listed as Least Concern (LC).  The Cook Inlet subpopulation of Beluga Whales was again classified as Critically Endangered (see Table 1 for details).  For three of the updated assessments, the Red List status remained the same as in the previous assessment and two were changed from Data Deficient (DD) to LC following new guidance from IUCN on how to interpret and apply the DD category. Work on updated and new assessments is continuing and we expect more to be published later in 2019.

Table 1 – Summary of updated assessments and new assessments published in the 2019-1 (Mar) Red List update. (NT = Near Threatened, DD = Data Deficient, CR = Critically Endangered, EN = Endangered, LC = Least Concern).

#
Species/Subspecies
Common name
Taxonomic level
Category
Status change
1
Tursiops truncatus
Common Bottlenose Dolphin
Species (global)
LC
 No change
2
Lagenorhynchus obscurus
Dusky Dolphin
Species (global)
LC
DD->LC
3
Stenella coeruleoalba
Striped Dolphin
Species (global)
LC
No change
4
Lagenorhynchus australis
Peale’s Dolphin
Species (global)
LC
DD->LC
5
Delphinapterus leucas
Beluga
Cook Inlet (subpopulation)
CR
No change

The Red List status and documentation for the 89 currently recognised cetacean species as well as 39 subspecies or subpopulations can be found on the IUCN Red List website (redlist.org).  Of the 89 species, 29% are assigned to a threatened category (i.e. CR, EN, VU, NT) and 30% are considered DD although ongoing reassessments of Data Deficient species are likely to result in some of them being reclassified in the near future (see Table 2). It should also be emphasized that there is strong interest in completing additional assessments of subpopulations that are known or thought to be at higher risk than the species as a whole (e.g. Killer Whales, Belugas, Dusky Dolphins, Amazon River Dolphin, Indo-Pacific Finless Porpoise, and Burmeister’s Porpoise etc.).

Table 2. Summary information on Red List status as of November 2018.

Category
Species
Subspecies/subpopulations
Total
Critically Endangered
3
16
19
Endangered
10
11
21
Vulnerable
7
8
15
Near Threatened
6
0
6
Least Concern
36
0
36
Lower Risk/Conservation Dependent*
0
1
1
Data Deficient
27
3
30
Total
89
39
128

*This is no longer a recognized category and this assessment (for the Bowhead Whale, Bering-Chuckchi-Beaufort Seas subpopulation) is out of date.

Posted in Red List | Leave a comment

Dead vaquita found in totoaba net

February 2019 Vaquita Update

This update summarizes net removals from February and news that also includes the first half of March.  The Report of the 11th meeting of CIRVA is summarized in an earlier news item on this website.  On 13 March a dead vaquita was found in a net by the Sea Shepherd net removal team (more details here).  The headless carcass of the female was identified as a vaquita by the University of Baja California in Ensenada using genetics and skeletal examination. With at most 22 vaquitas estimated to remain as of September 2018, the loss of this individual is very grave.

A new publication “Likely annual calving in the vaquita, Phocoena sinus: a new hope?” was published in Marine Mammal Science.

The number of net removals in February was lower than that in February 2018 but the effort this year was primarily in the last 2 weeks of the month because the Sea Shepherd ships were undergoing repairs and being modified to make them better able to withstand attacks from poachers.  Another difference between 2018 and 2019 is that net removal effort this year is being concentrated on the area where vaquitas were last seen and heard.  Like last year, 3 ships are removing nets:  the Narval (Museo de Ballena) and the Sharpie and Farley Mowat (Sea Shepherd).  A summary of efforts during 2018 was given in the December 2018 vaquita update.

December
January
February
TOTAL
Farley Mowat
41
13
6
60
Sharpie
8
8
Narval
9
10
19
TOTAL
41
22
24
87

The map below (Source: Sea Shepherd Conservation Society Internal Reports, 2019) shows the locations of active nets removed through February 2019 by both the Farley Mowat, Sharpie and Narval (yellow dots for Feburary and black dots for earlier this totoaba season).  The black line shows the area of enhanced protection including both the Vaquita Refuge and the enhanced enforcement area recommended by CIRVA  last year.

 

Posted in Critically Endangered, entanglements, Vaquita | Leave a comment

11th meeting of the Vaquita Recovery Team

The report of the 11th meeting of the international vaquita recovery team (CIRVA), held in La Jolla, California on 19-21 February 2019, is now available. The report recommends a series of immediate, near-term, medium-term, and long-term actions to prevent extinction of the vaquita. It calls on the Government of Mexico to do a great deal more than has been done to date to eliminate illegal fishing for totoaba, with the focus of enforcement and net-removal efforts now centered in the small area where the few remaining vaquitas have been observed (acoustically) and visually over the past six months. This is expected to be treated as a ‘Zero Tolerance Area’ where the goal is to remove any illegal net within hours of its deployment, particularly during the totoaba season, which continues through April and into early May. The report also provides updates on the acoustic monitoring program and other scientific work, net-removal efforts, development and testing of alternative fishing gear, and various socio-economic and legal issues.

 

Posted in Critically Endangered, entanglements, Meetings, Vaquita | Leave a comment

January 2019 Vaquita Update

January was a month marked by the violent action of illegal fishermen directed toward people engaged in net removal efforts. Press releases including video of the attacks are available here for the January 9th attack and here for the January 31st attack. Men in multiple pangas set upon the Sea Shepherd’s Farley Mowat and a Navy Defender vessel, throwing rocks and Molotov cocktails. Because of these attacks, only 7 days of net-removal effort were possible (4 for the Farley Mowat and 3 for the Museo de Ballena’s Narval). Twenty-two active totoaba nets were removed, all within the Vaquita Refuge and near where the attacks occurred.

The net-removal effort will resume because, as the totoaba spawning season advances, conditions become increasingly dangerous for the remaining vaquitas.  Through December 2018, the first month of the 2018-2019 totoaba spawning season, 41 active totoaba nets were removed by the Farley Mowat, more than were removed in December 2017.

A recap of efforts during 2018 can be found in the December 2018 vaquita update.

The map below (Source: Sea Shepherd Conservation Society Internal Reports, 2019) shows the locations of active nets removed in January 2019 by both the Farley Mowat and Narval (black dots for December and yellow dots for January). The black line shows the area of enhanced protection including both the Vaquita Refuge and the enhanced enforcement area recommended by the 2018 CIRVA meeting.

Posted in Critically Endangered, entanglements, Vaquita | Leave a comment